Tuesday, 30 July 2013

Can GRN “walk the talk”?


What does this mean for as consumers of the Government of the Republic of Namibia?
  • STANDARDS
  • INFORMATION
  • COURTESY AND HELPFULNESS
  • CONSULTATION AND PARTICIPATION
  • ACCOUNTABILITY
  • TRANSPARENCY
  • NON-DISCRIMINATION
  • QUALITY OF SERIVCE
  • VALUE FOR MONEY
  • ACCESSIBILITY


In Namibia, the Government is one of the biggest single employers and provides services in all sectors of the economy.  Thus it is an important service provider and according to President Hifikepunye Pohamba, "there is a growing international trend for governments, in both developed and developing countries, to focus on the need to provide greater value for money in the delivery of public services. This has led to greater awareness that public services must improve the quality of the service being rendered to the customers: citizens, tourists and visiting businessmen and women. For Namibia to realise Vision 2030, we must "walk to talk" and sharpen our commitment to improve the quality of services delivered to all who live in or visit our country.”

The President was speaking at the launch of the reviewed Namibian Public Service Charter in 2012. The Charter was first launched by the Founding President, Sam Nujoma in 1997 and had nine general principles. After the review, accessibility was added as a principle and thus there are now ten. They are:

STANDARDS

This means each ministry, organisation or state owned enterprise must set, publish and monitor clear standards of service that a public servant should uphold.

INFORMATION

The state organs should provide information about the public services they offer in a prompt straightforward and open manner that is readily understandable to all consumers.


COURTESY AND HELPFULNESS

Each public servant (GRN employee) must provide a courteous and helpful service suitable to the convenience of those entitled to the service.


CONSULTATION AND PARTICIPATION

Ensuring that there is regular consultation with those who use the services of the public sector and, having taken their views and priorities into account, provide a choice wherever possible to the benefit of the consumer.

ACCOUNTABILITY

Provide details of performance against targets and identifying who is responsible. Such services are being provided by public servants who can be identified readily by their customers as they should be wearing name badges. This is to ensure that public servants are accountable for their actions at all times.

TRANSPARENCY

Disclose how public services are managed together with the cost and performance of specific services which are open to public scrutiny in all actions taken in public office.

NON-DISCRIMINATION

Ensuring that services are available and provided equally and fairly to all.

QUALITY OF SERVICE

Publicize straightforward feedback procedures. Provide where errors have been made, an apology, full explanation and early correction of the error.


VALUE FOR MONEY

Provide efficient, effective and affordable public services.


ACCESSIBILITY

Ensure accessibility to public service by accommodating the service needs of our service users

It is interesting to note that at the launch in 1997, the Founding President stated, “It is also my hope that parastatals and the private sector will follow this example and helps make the delivery of services in Namibia as efficient, cost-effective and consumer-focused as possible.”

Let us hope that will come to pass

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